Outwell, Norfolk – St Clement

We drove on a mile and parked by the east side of St Clement’s in Outwell. The Nene flows round two sides of it, grid reference TF 513036.  There is a Friends website (it has an excellent section on the church history, and a link to an article on all the carvings), and Simon’s site is – as always – worth a read – here.

St Clement, Pope and martyr, circa AD 100, is the patron saint of mariners – a good dedication for this inland port. The tower is C13 Early English at the bottom, C14 higher up, and there was a very tall spire until 1753. The porch is a C15 reconstruction, with a parvis (priest’s room) above – one day I shall retire to a room up there. The church was open – they do a café on a Tuesday. Into the church, and there is a notice making sure the visitor knows what he or she is to do!

I feel a bit guilty – after Upwell I was a little angeled out. I looked up, and looked at the display, and took some photos. I hope they will get some better photos than mine on the Friends’ website.

This is another fabulous piece of carving, but could we please sort out the lights and the wiring?

The are some lovely stone carvings too – lots of faces, human and angelic.

I think the Green Men were in the Fincham Chapel – the carving is rather wonderful.

A rather lovely memorial, Balthazar (one of the Magi), some nice glass, and some hideous Victorian yellow glass in the East Window (I wonder if they could ask their neighbouring village how to get rid of it (have a read of my last blog)).

A nice wooden table, C15 parish chest (another one imported from Poland). The wooden C17 alms box was made to receive offerings, through the appropriate opening, from women at their churching; one face represents a boy, another a girl, and the third, with two slots, twins – presumably if you had triplets you got a free churching!

I haven’t done this church justice, and I apologise. Even northernvicar can get a bit over-whelmed. I will come back.

The Wisbech and Upwell Tramway ran passed the church, and there is a nice memorial to a line I wish I’d travelled. (The various web links to the line and its history are on the previous blog).

 

 

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